September 29, 2014


How to Wear Miranda Bennett’s Top Everywhere

ofakind:

Let her pal Cheyenne show you the way.

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When Miranda Bennett describes her clothes as easy and versatile, she ain’t kidding around. “My collection is one-size-fits-most, from size zero to ten,” she says. “It’s a big part of the philosophy of my brand to offer clothes that almost anyone can wear to anywhere.” To make her point, Miranda asked her pal Cheyenne Weaver, co-founder of Austin-based GirlsGuild, which connects makers with potential apprentices, to show-and-tell how she’d wear her Of a Kind top on a crazy-busy day. genevieve ang

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1 P.M. – Hitting the Office

Cheyenne: “My days fluctuate a lot—generally I work from home in the morning and meet my co-founder Diana after lunch at GirlsGuild HQ at the Austin Center for Design. The clothes I wear for a typical day are usually very casual—I’d like to give the person who made work-sweatpants possible a medal, but I’m also often in jeans and a loose top.”

Miranda: “This is a simple option for a super-flexible day. I don’t believe in rules like “no white after Labor Day”—I’m more dictated by personal style. If it works for you and your wardrobe, you can wear whatever you want, whenever you want!”

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3 P.M. – Nailing a Presentation

Cheyenne: “We’re organizing a panel at the Harmony STEM schools for 800-plus high-school girls to promote tech for women, so I think it will be important to dress fun and fashionably to represent women in tech in a different light. This outfit, with its big necklace and cute skirt, is a winner.”

Miranda: “My go-to polished look is the dress version of this top with a nice accessory and my Rachel Comey shoes. I feel like I’m outing myself—now anyone who meets with me will know what I’m going to wear!”

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7 P.M. – Swinging by an Art Opening at Big Medium

Cheyenne: “I especially love the drape of this shirt at the shoulders—the style is so subtle and elegant and can anchor so many different outfits. In addition to Big Medium, which recently closed an amazing exhibition of Kim Westall’s work, I’m also a huge fan of MASS Gallery and Arthouse.”

Miranda: “For an art opening or a cool nighttime event, don’t be afraid to layer unconventionally. I definitely do that a lot when I’m travelling given that I live in Texas. It gives new life to pieces I need to repeat-wear, and you can create really unexpected silhouettes that way.”

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9 P.M. – Grabbing Duck and Fig Ravioli from Botticelli’s

Cheyenne: “I’ll confess that starting a business has produced a lot of slouchy, take-out dinners in the past two years, but when I do get dressed up to go out, I’m all about the black flats and some sort of vintage dress or trousers.”

Miranda: “My style is timeless, classic, and personal—I have an ever-expanding jewelry collection from all my friends! When I’m out to dinner, my go-to accessory is a pop of color on my lips, like this Universalist Matte Multi-Use Colorstick from the Austin-based organic beauty company, W3LL People.”

Images by Nicole Mlakar.

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thedogist:
Mason, Labrador Retriever (3 m/o), 18th & Broadway, New York, NY

thedogist:

Mason, Labrador Retriever (3 m/o), 18th & Broadway, New York, NY

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September 28, 2014


This body, though fragile, fits.
The intervals slip easily out of the throat:
Minor third, flat seventh, flat fifth.

Everything now is purpose and light,
Evening air transparent as a glass of everclear.
Sorrow in the music, yes, but hollow bones float

His blueness, a flash in infinity, sheer atmosphere—
Maybe holy, he thinks, but don’t quote him on it:
Once back down in nature, he will never

Give it up again for nothing better than heartsick spirit.

T. R. Hummer, section IV “As Bluebird” in “Lives of the Angels: Duets for Saxophone and Sky,” The Infinity Sessions: Poems (Louisiana State University Press, 2005)

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justthedesign:

Nika Huk is wearing a trench coat from Chicwish, pale blue shirt dress from Chicnova, jeggings and shoes from Asos and the bag is from Michael Kors

justthedesign:

Nika Huk is wearing a trench coat from Chicwish, pale blue shirt dress from Chicnova, jeggings and shoes from Asos and the bag is from Michael Kors

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September 26, 2014


womensweardaily:

In her new book, “I’ll Drink to That: A Life in Style, With a Twist,” (Penguin Press) Betty Halbreich is equally unsparing about her own challenges: a frayed marriage, her attempted suicide, the struggles of motherhood, overcoming polio and then cancer. Fashion, of course, is a thread that runs through it all. For More

womensweardaily:

In her new book, “I’ll Drink to That: A Life in Style, With a Twist,” (Penguin Press) Betty Halbreich is equally unsparing about her own challenges: a frayed marriage, her attempted suicide, the struggles of motherhood, overcoming polio and then cancer. Fashion, of course, is a thread that runs through it all. For More

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thelifestyleeditor:

I have long been a fan of the tile collections produced by Fired Earth, and their latest new additions don’t disappoint. They take their inspiration for their designs from far and wide, including far flung destinations such as Morocco, Malta, Shanghai and Stockholm. From the quirky new hexagons in the Graphix range, the classic Marrakech vibe of Ourika to the encaustic Valletta tile, inspired by a 16th century home in Malta, their range is ever expanding and always inspiring. Accompanied by beautiful lifestyle photography, take a look at their new collections here.

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Be crumbled so wildflowers will come up where you are. You have been stony for too many years. Try something different. Surrender.

Rumi  (via thatkindofwoman)

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September 24, 2014


The tumult in the heart
keeps asking questions.
And then it stops and undertakes to answer
in the same tone of voice.
No one could tell the difference.

Elizabeth Bishop, from “Conversation,” The Complete Poems: 1927-1979 (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1983)

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[W]ords evaporate like water in a dish
leaving you with a sense of something meant,
but not the memory of what was said,
or how, or when.
Things stay as they are (call them facts)
even with the names you learn to give them;
poems (you tell yourself) are so many ways
of naming things you’ve seen
once and may not see again,
except for tricks of remembering;
for words forget themselves
and move among the things you cannot name,
and what you know by touch and tact
seems merely a vanishing thing.

Vinay Dharwadker, from Words and Things” The Bloodaxe Book of Contemporary Indian Poets (Bloodaxe Books, 2009)

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It’s September: I’ve moved into town,
into the attic of an old barn—a big open room I reach
by climbing a ladder that rises through a hole in the floor.
The room is long and high, with windows at each end,
a row of skylights that leak rain, and shake
and chatter in the northeast winds. I sleep beneath
the roof’s steep pitch, my mattress flat on the boards,
looking up at the high ceiling, where morning
diffuses downward in grains of bright dust.

This was the old painter’s studio.
The light in those famous canvases is still here
—he couldn’t carry it away with him—
though his paintings took away everything else,
opening space with a stroke of blue or yellow.
I think of his violent loves, the stories
they still tell about him here.
But how quiet and alive his paintings were,
how they quiver with the life not yet realized.

Cynthia Huntington, from “The Attic,” The Radiant (Four Ways Books, 2003)

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